Category Archives: Sangha

Chanting Pali

There are a variety of chants that are often recited. These chants include reflections and recitations on the qualities of the Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha; the recitation of moral training rules; the practice of loving-friendliness, Compassion, Sympathetic Joy, and Equanimity. Included here you will find the pali chants and english translations designed to assist you in learning the true meaning of the material. Chanting words that you do not understand is not a valuable exercise; however, taking time to learn the meaning of the pali and reflecting on the meaning of the chants can become a valuable part of your meditation  practice.

5 Training Rules
Pali Compass
Verses of Protection
9 Qualities of the Buddha
Four Noble Practices (Metta)
Remembering the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha

The Buddhist Temple Logo

The Buddhist TempleThe Buddhist Temple logo is made up of 2 symbolic Buddhist elements: the Bodhi Leaf and the Dhamma Wheel along with the Dhamma of the Eightfold Path.

According to Buddhist tradition, the tree under which the Buddha sat when he attained Enlightenment at Bodh Gaya (near Gaya, west-central Bihar state, India) was a Bodhi tree (Ficus religiosa). A sapling in Sri Lanka, is said to have grown from a cutting from the tree sent to that city by King Ashoka in the 3rd century BC.

The Dhamma Wheel symbol is represented as a chariot wheel with eight spokes. It is the oldest known Buddhist symbol found in Indian art, appearing with the first surviving post-Harappan Indian iconography in the time of the Buddhist king Aśoka. The Dhamma Wheel has been used by all Buddhist nations as a symbol ever since. In its simplest form it is recognized globally as a symbol for Buddhism.  The eight spokes represent the Noble Eightfold Path of Buddhism. They are said to have sharp edges to cut through ignorance.

The words on each of the spokes of the wheel are Pali words used to define the Eight Fold Path given by the Buddha.

Nashville Shambhala Meditation Group

http://www.shambhala.org/centers/nashville/

The Nashville Shambhala Meditation Group is part of an international community of urban meditation and rural retreat centers founded by Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche and further developed by his son and lineage holder Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche. Shambhala vision is rooted in the contemplative teachings of Buddhism, yet is a fresh expression of the spiritual journey for our time.

Nashville Zen Center

http://nashvillezencenter.org/

The Nashville Zen Center (Bringing NoThing to Nashville Since 1982) was founded in 1982 by people interested in Zen Buddhist practice. Like each of us, our Center has no fixed Self, and has evolved and undergone many changes over the years. Currently, we offer Zen practice in the Soto tradition (Japanese), in the lineage of Zengaku Soyu Matsuoka, Roshi. Most sessions are led by students of Taiun Michael Elliston, Roshi, Abbot of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and head of the Silent Thunder Order of Soto Zen practice. We welcome everyone to experience this practice with us; From the merely curious to the serious seeker, we have a cushion just for you!

Padmasambhava Buddhist Center of Tenessee

http://pbc-tn.org/

The Khenpo Rinpoche’s first began teaching in Tennessee in 1987 and in 1990 Padmasambhava Buddhist Center of Tennessee was established. Now one of region’s largest Tibetan dharma groups, we meet regularly at our center; the Yeshe Tsogyal House in Nashville and hold annual retreats led by the Khenpo Rinpoches at Padma Gochen Ling, our rustic retreat center outside Monterey, Tennessee. We would sincerely like to express our many thanks for the generosity and commitment of our sangha members and friends in supporting Rinpoche’s vision here in Tennessee

One Dharma

http://www.onedharmanashville.com/

One Dharma Nashville is an integrative Buddhist meditation and study group that draws from the wisdom traditions of Zen, Vipassana and Tibetan. We were founded in 2006 by meditation teacher Lisa Ernst, who wished to offer a contemporary Buddhist sangha that also maintains its roots in traditional teachings and practices. One Dharma is at the forefront of Western Buddhism, where we have access to all of the great dharma traditions that were once segregated by geography in the East. Each of the three traditions offer teachings and practices such as lovingkindness, compassion and mindfulness, that can help us realize true freedom in our own lives.

About Sangha

About Sangha

In taking refuge in the Sangha, we set our sights on the ideal community of Noble Ones.

Originally, Sangha refers to a group/community of monks. In modern term, Sangha refers to a community of Buddhism practitioners. Sangha is part of the Three Jewels in which we take refuge : the Buddha , the Dharma , the Sangha .

In taking refuge in the Sangha, we set our sights on the ideal community of Noble Ones ( ariya-sangha ) — those monks, nuns, laywomen, and laymen who, throughout history, have by their own diligent efforts successfully carried out the Buddha’s instructions and gained at least a glimpse of the supreme happiness.

We are also asked to turn to the monastic community ( bhikkhu-sangha ) for refuge, for it is thanks to the unbroken lineage of this 2,600-year-old institution that we are fortunate enough today to be able to hear the teachings.

Qualities of Sangha

Qualities of Sangha

The Sangha (the Community of Noble Ones) has the nine qualities as follows: (1) The disciples of the Blessed One practice well the threefold training of morality, concentration and wisdom, (2) The disciples of the Blessed One practice righteously the threefold training, (3) The disciples of the Blessed One practice to realize nibbana, (4) The disciples of the Blessed One practice to be worthy of veneration, (5) Being worthy of receiving offerings brought even from afar, (6) Being worthy of receiving offerings specially set aside for guests, (7) Being worthy of receiving offerings offered with the belief that the offering will bear fruits in future existences, (8) Being worthy of receiving reverential salutation, and (9) Being an unsurpassed (incomparable) fertile field for planting the seeds of merit for the world.

The Nine Qualities of the Sangha

The eight kinds of noble ones are collectively known as the Sangha. The non-ariya ones (Sammuti Sangha) who have the same view and the same moral practice as the noble ones (Ariya Sangha) are also included in the Sangha. The Sangha being endowed with nine supreme attributes, should be highly honored and venerated. The Sangha is peerless because it enables one who contact with the Sangha to achieve happiness and prosperity in the present existence as well as in future existences. The Sangha is an incomparable treasure because the members of the Sangha are incomparable in morality, concentration and wisdom in the whole world. The Sangha is extremely difficult to come across because it comes into existence only when the Buddha arises in the world. Only those who have accumulated great merits can revere and venerate this Sangha. Therefore the Sangha is the most honorable, most precious, most incomparable, most rare and most worthy treasure in the whole Universe.

The Eight Kinds of Noble Ones are:
* The first pair of the one who stands on the First Path and the one who stands in the First Fruition,
* The second pair of the one who stands on the Second Path and the one who stands in the Second Fruition,
* The third pair of the one who stands on the Third Path and the one who stands in the Third Fruition, and
* The fourth pair of the one who stands on the Fourth Path and the one who stands in the Fourth Fruition.

The Sangha (the Community of Noble Ones) has the nine qualities as follows:

(1) Suppatipanno Bhagavato Savakasamgho – The disciples of the Blessed One practice well the threefold training of morality, concentration and wisdom,

(2) Ujuppatipanno Bhagavato Savakasamgho – The disciples of the Blessed One practice righteously the threefold training,

(3) Nyayappatipanno Bhagavato Savakasamgho – The disciples of the Blessed One practice to realize nibbana,

(4) Samicippatipanno Bhagavato Savakasamgho – The disciples of the Blessed One practice to be worthy of veneration,

(5) Ahuneyyo – being worthy of receiving offerings brought even from afar,

(6) Pahuneyyo  -Being worthy of receiving offerings specially set aside for guests,

(7) Dakkhineyyo – being worthy of receiving offerings offered with the belief that the offering will bear fruits in future existences,

(8) Anjalikaraniyo – being worthy of receiving reverential salutation, and

(9) Anuttaram Punnakkhettam Lokassa – being an unsurpassed (incomparable) fertile field for planting the seeds of merit for the world.

     (1) Practicing Well the Threefold Trainings
The Sangha (The community of the disciples) of the Blessed One has practiced Dhamma well (with ever mindful, great effort, deep concentration, right thought and sharp wisdom) the threefold training rules Sila – bodily and verbal discipline, Samadhi – mental discipline, and Panna – knowledge discipline (seeing things as they truly are).

     (2) Practicing Righteously the Threefold Trainings
The Sangha has practiced Dhamma righteously (without concealing one$(Bs (Bfault, without pretending to be flawless, without pretending to have qualities or abilities) the threefold training rules.

     (3) Practicing to Realize Nibbana
The Sangha has practiced Dhamma the eagerly and perpetually because once a person enters a stream, he will not have a chance to be reborn in any woeful states, hell of intense continuous suffering, animal, ever hungry being, and being in miserable and remote places.

     (4) Practicing to be Worthy of Veneration
The Sangha has practiced Dhamma, that is worthy of all veneration.

     (5) Being Worthy of Receiving Offerings Brought even from afar
The Sangha is worthy of offerings (four requisites – alms, robe, lodging, medicine) which are brought even from far away.

     (6) Being Worthy of Receiving Offerings specially set aside for guests
The Sangha is worthy of offerings (things given to visitors like dear and beloved relatives and friends who come from all quarters).

     (7) Being Worthy of Receiving Offerings given for a next life
The Sangha is worthy of receiving offerings that is given out of faith in the next world (life).

     (8) Being Worthy of receiving Reverential Salutation
The Sangha is honored with both hands above the head by the whole world, thus it is worthy of reverential salutation.

     (9) Being the Unsurpassed Fertile Field of Merit for the World
The Sangha is the place for growing the whole world’s merit. Depending on it, the world’s various kinds of merit leading to welfare and happiness grow, thus the Sangha is an unsurpassed field of merit for the world.

     The Benefits of Reflecting upon Qualities of the Sangha
As long as someone reflects upon qualities of the Sangha, his mind is invaded neither by greed, nor by anger, nor by delusion. He has a right state of mind being inspired by the Sangha. And when he has suppressed the hindrances, the Jhana-factors arise in a single mind-moment. Furthermore, when a person reflects upon qualities of the Sangha, he is respectful and deferential towards the Sangha. He attains faithfulness and has much happiness and gladness. He also overcomes fear and dread. He is able to bear pain and comes to feel as if he were living in the Sangha’s presence. The body of who dwells in the reflection of Sangha’s qualities becomes as worthy of veneration as Uposatha house (a chapter house) where the Sangha assembles. When he encounters an opportunity for wrong-doing, he has a strong awareness of conscience and shame as if he were in the presence of the Sangha. If he comprehends no higher, he will be at least born in a happy state.

Sangha

Originally, Sangha refers to a group/community of monks. In modern term, Sangha refers to a community of Buddhism practitioners. Sangha is part of the Three Jewels in which we take refuge : the Buddha , the Dhamma , the Sangha .